Brian Jeffries, MBA

Brian Jeffries, MBA

Politics, Policy and Race

Brian Jeffries, MBA

A child of the 60s, Brian Jeffries has been interested in the political process since the 1972 presidential election. His grade school class held a mock presidential election which liberal Democrat McGovern carried by 29 votes to 1. Young Brian was certain that his candidate would therefore go on to win the general election and was shocked when Nixon won in a landslide, winning 49 states on his way to an electoral college victory of 520 to 17.

On the professional front, Brian has packed several careers into the roughly 30 years since college. He has been an engineer with a newly deregulated telephone company, a management consultant stationed in newly post apartheid South Africa, an entrepreneur and founder of a venture backed tech firm. He has a passion for small businesses, and after owing several, has leveraged that experience into business brokerage where he specializes in businesses valued between $200,000 to $2,000,000.

Brian is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Engineering School, where he earned a BS in Applied Science. He is also a graduate of the University of Michigan Business School where he earned an MBA focused in Corporate Strategy and Finance. Brian is a native of Philadelphia, and lived in Washington DC, Ann Arbor MI, Johannesburg South Africa, Chicago and San Francisco before finding home in Oakland CA. Brian is married with 2 teenage children.

My Writing

On this page you will find the thoughts of the author, a 50 year old biracial Black man from Philadelphia. Those thoughts are usually about politics and policy, but are almost always informed by the ramifications of race on the issues presented. The author tends to have strongly held opinions that are informed by his personal experiences, his Unitarian Universalist faith, the fact that he's an engineer by education and an entrepreneur by experience. He tends towards the sarcastic because, well, because Philadelphia. But he avoids malice at all costs, even when it is richly deserved. He will make every attempt to back his opinions up with facts and/or sound logic, but recognizes that that's more an aspiration than a promise. He's probably also a little tired and cranky from never being right, since he is also the father of two teenagers.

Articles by Brian Jeffries, MBA

100 people, 100 dollars

My daughter asked me today about the Occupy protests. She’s heard me blathering excitedly about them and was curious about what they are doing and why. It’s can be a pretty tricky topic to explain to most adults, and touches on the financial crisis, credit default swaps, the decline of the labor movement, Glass-Steagel, Citizens United, etc., so I struggled a bit about how to explain it to a 10 year old. Rather than tell her, I decided to pose a situation and ask her some questions about it. Me: Imagine if the whole country were just a group...

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The Last Conversation with my Dad

My father died in 1995. I didn’t hear about his death for at least a week after it happened. My oldest brother – half brother actually, his first son – found my mom’s phone number, called her, and she called me with the news. A week after he died, I learned that he had succumbed to TB. This was his second battle with TB in a few years. He was 68. At that point, I hadn’t talked to him for at least 2 years. So I guess the extra week that it took for me to find out that...

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A Closed Mind

Normally I don’t write a takedown piece, where the writer analyzes the arguments of another with the goal of dissecting them. And normally I don’t make public the Facebook writings of anyone else. But this interaction on my wall was so over the top, that I’ll make an exception. Original Post: Me: This article is old, but points out that in a civilized society, less crime should mean fewer prisoners. Yet we have much less crime in our country and vastly more prisoners. That is a natural result of privatizing the prison industry. A couple of friends commented initially, but I’m...

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